Telephone: 02 4304 7600

OUR BIRDS

There are seven known families of Eastern Osprey on the Central Coast. One of which lives in the light tower on the Western Grandstand.

Mum and her two recently hatched chicks have a specially-made home provided by Central Coast Council aimed at encouraging breeding of the rare breed of bird. 

 

 

IS THAT AN OSPREY? 

The Eastern Osprey is a large, water-dependent bird of prey, distinctive in flight and when perched. Despite its wing-pan of up to 1.7m, it is noticeably smaller than the white-bellied Sea Eagle. 

It can be recognised by bowed wings that are dark brown on top, barred underneath, and white underwing coverts. The female has a dark streaky collar. The head is mainly white with a black stripe over the eye.

 

WHERE CAN I FIND AN OSPREY?

Besides our Gosford family, there a four subspecies that are dispersed globally. 

The Eastern Ospreys are special to Australia and can be found around most of the Australian coast line (expect for Victoria and Tasmania).

Despite their name, they are more commonly found living amongst rocky shorelines, islands and reefs on the northern coast. They love coastal areas, especially the mouths of large rivers, lagoons and lakes.


WHAT DO THEY EAT?

Osprey feed on fish over clear, open waters which is why ours loves the spectacular view of the Brisbane Water. 


BREEDING

They breed from July to September and create nests high up in dead trees, usually within one kilometre of the sea... sound familiar? 

The female remains with the young (usually 2-3 babies) almost until they can fly. This is usually after roughly nine weeks in the nest.